Projects

KIROV STREET

Project by Mariya Andryushchenko, Anna Kondratieva and Nigina Sharopova for the Sergey Kirov Museum

The curators group Mariya Andryushchenko, Anna Kondratieva and Nigina Sharopova created a research project especially developed for the Sergei M. Kirov Museum in St. Petersburg. The project examines a wide spread phenomenon in times of political change and takeovers: the renaming of streets, in the given case the naming and renaming of the Kirov street.

 

 

Sergei M. Kirov (1886-1934) was a prominent early Bolshevik leader in the Soviet Union and became head of the CPSU organization in Leningrad, before he was killed by a gunman at his offices in the Smolny. The project consists of three different parts: One is a card-filling system that is dedicated to (still-existing) Kirov streets in ca. 300 Russian cities with more than 50 thousand inhabitants. The filing cards contain short information about the history of these streets and their renaming. The second part of the project is a shelf containing 5 different albums designed in a Soviet manner and containing photographs, newspaper clippings, postcards and notes about Kirov streets in 5 Russian cities. The third part of the project contains vitrines with everyday objects of symbolical meaning that relate to stories in the albums.

Mariya Andryushchenko, Anna Kondratieva and Nigina Sharopova (Russia, Moscow)

The group of curators Mariya Andryushchenko, Anna Kondratieva and Nigina Sharopova was founded in 2016 on the basis of a common friendship and a shared interest in the research of contemporary cultural processes. The different professional orientations (curatorship, museum design, and philosophy) enable a multi-layered artistic narrative.

Mariya Andryushchenko is an art-critic and curator. She is a graduate of the Art Criticism and Curatorial Research program of the St Petersburg State University/Bard College. She was a co-curator of the exhibition corpus|media in the framework of the festival 101 at the Aleksandrovsky Theater in St. Petersburg (2015) and curator of the exhibition .txt at the Gogol House in Moscow (2016).

Anna Kondratieva is a culturologist and a museum designer. She currently works at the Museum of the History of the GULAG in Moscow. She graduated from the Russian Academy for National Economy and Public Service and received her master degree in Visual Culture from the National Research University Higher School of Economics. She worked at the Moscow Branch of Ralph Appelbaum Associates (projects Museum of Moscow Transport System, Museum of Russian Emigration and others).

Nigina Sharopova is a philosopher and a culturologist. She graduated from the Philosophical faculty of the Institute for Philosophy at the Russian Academy of Science and received her master degree in Visual Culture from the National Research University Higher School of Economics. She is a research assistant at the Institute for Philosophy at the Russian Academy of Science / Sector of aesthetics.

Sergei Kirov Museum

The Sergei Kirov Museum is located in the historic center of St. Petersburg, in 26-28 Kamennoostroovsky зrospect. This tenement house, one of the biggest in pre- Revolutionary St. Petersburg, was commissioned for “The First Russian Insurance Society”. It was built in 1911 -1914 by Leontiy, Alexander, Yuliy Benois, and Alexander Gunst. After the 1917 Revolution, the best apartments were given to the local Party leaders, and Sergei Kirov, who headed the Leningrad Communist Party organization from 1926 to 1934 was one of them. In 1955 the #20 apartment he had shared with his wife, Maria Markus, was turned into a museum.

 

The Sergei Kirov Museum is one of the most unique monuments of the Stalin epoch. Apart from five living rooms with authentic interiors visitors get a chance to view two halls, a bathroom and a kitchen; the homemaker’s room features an interactive game “Beri Chto Dayut” (Beggars Can’t Be Choosers), which gives an idea of the Soviet coupon system of the 1920-30s. In the Museum cinema-hall visitors can also watch archive newsreels of the first five-year-plans, early Soviet cartoons and films that give a better idea about social, economic, political, and cultural aspects of Leningrad and daily life of a Party leader in the 1920-1930s.

 

 

Address: 26-28, Kamennoostroovsky prospect

Closest metro stations: Petrogradskaya, Gorkovskaya

Tel.: +7 (812) 346 – 0289

Museum hours: Thursday –Tuesday 11:00-18:00

Closed: Wednesday